Quest Camper Profile

One of the great things about Quest Camp is that it has been found to benefit a wide range of children. Quest Campers do not look or act strikingly different from other children. Watching our campers play and interact would appear no different from children on any given playground. The problems Quest Campers experience are often more subtle, yet can have significant impact on the child and his/her family.

Both boys and girls aged 6 – 18 participate in our program. Campers experience mild to moderate difficulties behaviorally, emotionally or socially. Quest campers may struggle finding stable relationships or consistently achieving their goals.

While some campers have been diagnosed with a psychological disorder, others have never been diagnosed with a psychological issue and may just have trouble “fitting in” with their peers and need help developing social skills and self-esteem.

Quest Campers may have diagnoses of ADHD, anxiety, Asperger's Syndrome, depression, learning disabilities or social problems. Children who have severe aggressiveness or serious psychological problems, however, are not appropriate for the program.

Quest provides opportunities for children to improve problematic behaviors and self-esteem by creating an atmosphere where campers feel respected and accepted. From the first interaction at camp, the Quest System has been developed to allow campers to take the risk to listen to staff direction, try new positive behaviors, handle failure and develop positive relationships with other campers and staff.

Quest has been proven to work and provides campers the opportunity for consistent improvement in self-esteem and behavior. The Quest System empowers children to make positive changes on their own by understanding their personal challenges and developing methods of improvement.

All new campers are professionally screened before they attend camp and campers’ individualized treatment plans are created based on their screening and detailed input from parents.